medium

The Correct spelling is: medium

Common misspellings of the word medium are:

How do you spell medium?. It is not

  • n., pl. -di·a (-dÄ“-É™) or -di·ums.
    1. Something, such as an intermediate course of action, that occupies a position or represents a condition midway between extremes.
    2. An intervening substance through which something else is transmitted or carried on.
    3. An agency by which something is accomplished, conveyed, or transferred: The train was the usual medium of transportation in those days.
    4. pl. media. Usage Problem.
      1. A means of mass communication, such as newpapers, magazines, radio, or television.
      2. media (used with a sing. or pl. verb) The group of journalists and others who constitute the communications industry and profession.
    5. pl. media. Computer Science. An object or device, such as a disk, on which data is stored.
    6. pl. mediums. A person thought to have the power to communicate with the spirits of the dead or with agents of another world or dimension. Also called psychic.
    7. pl. media.
      1. A surrounding environment in which something functions and thrives.
      2. The substance in which a specific organism lives and thrives.
      3. A culture medium.
      1. A specific kind of artistic technique or means of expression as determined by the materials used or the creative methods involved: the medium of lithography.
      2. The materials used in a specific artistic technique: oils as a medium.
    8. A solvent with which paint is thinned to the proper consistency.
    9. Chemistry. A filtering substance, such as filter paper.
    10. A size of paper, usually 18 × 23 inches or 171/2 × 22 inches.
    adj.

    Occurring or being between two degrees, amounts, or quantities; intermediate: broil a medium steak. See synonyms at average.

    [Latin, from neuter of medius, middle.]

    USAGE NOTE   The etymologically plural form media is often used as a singular to refer to a particular means of communication, as in The Internet is the most exciting new media since television. Many people regard this usage as incorrect, preferring medium in such contexts. • People also use media with the definite article as a collective term to refer not to the forms of communication themselves so much as the communities and institutions behind them. In this sense, the media means something like “the press.” Like other collective nouns, it may take a singular or plural verb depending on the intended meaning. If the point is to emphasize the multifaceted nature of the press, a plural verb may be more appropriate: The media have covered the trial in a variety of formats. Frequently, however, media stands as a singular noun for the aggregate of journalists and broadcasters: The media has not shown much interest in covering the trial. This development of a singular media parallels that of more established words such as data and agenda, which are also Latin plurals that have acquired a singular meaning. • The singular medium cannot be used as a collective noun for the press. The sentence No medium has shown much interest in covering the issue, would suggest that the lack of interest is in the means of communication itself rather than in its practitioners.


  • Home | Sitemap
    © 2014 - 82614 Visits